Local crystal healers host Metaphysical Night at The Perfect Blend

Metaphysical Night
Bianca Thiruchittampalam/THE REVIEW
“I’ve been studying the metaphysical, the occult, and healing since I was a kid,” Fae says. “I’m an intuitive healer” (from left to right: Wann, Fae’s son Lucian, Fae, and Cerridwen).

BY
Column Editor

Friday evening brought not only the end of my first week back, but also a surprising, unforeseen situation: I was sitting with my legs crossed in a comfy armchair at The Perfect Blend, staring at a deck of tarot cards fanned out before me.

Friday’s circumstances were not typical at The Perfect Blend, a Main Street coffee shop that specializes in waffles. Jeanne Koreas, owner of The Perfect Blend, invited Sindar Isis Fae, Michael Wann, Amaya Cerridwen and Lynn “Lynx Cat” Neal, a collection of crystal healers and oracle readers, for Metaphysical Night. Clients could get a tarot card reading by Fae, Wann or Cerridwen, or receive a crystal healing from Neal, all the while enjoying a cup of coffee or a waffle.

“We did one [a Metaphysical Night] about a month ago and people were really grateful for it,” Koreas says. “There was so much insight that these folks [the healers and readers] gave to people that I was like, ‘Let’s do it again.’”

Going into the reading, I admit that I was a bit skeptical: I had always held a faint interest and belief in crystals, readings and the supernatural; however, I never believed that cards or iridescent stones could reveal my psyche. The enthusiasm of Koreas and the twenty or so clients helped erode my skepticism.

While Fae and Wann had different approaches to the reading, both readings adhered to the same basic structure.

Both would ask me to pose a question — I chose the same question for both readings — and ruminate over it. Then I picked a tarot card from three different decks, and a crystal to correspond to each card. Fae and Wann would then interpret the meaning of the card and crystal together.

Unlike the stereotype of crystal healers and oracle readers seen on television, neither Fae nor Wann promised to tell my future. Rather, they promised me insight on my life. During my reading with Fae, I picked the dog card, which Fae interpreted as my spirit animal and representative of a close bond with a dog. I immediately began to reflect on the strong, emotional relationship I had built with my dog at home and the copious amounts of time we had spent together. While this could be merely coincidence, I found that many of the cards and crystals I chose bore an uncanny likeness to my life: for example, one card revealed a close relationship with my mother and another discussed my enjoyment of being introverted.

Fae’s interest in crystals was met with some resistance from her family, whom she describes as “very Christian.”

“I have a big Christian background and I love everyone but my family is afraid of what I do,” Fae says. “They think it’s evil. My aunt is a pastor and it scares her, which is strange to me. If you’ve ever seen a crystal, there’s nothing scary about it. It’s beautiful.”

Although the crowd was largely receptive to the alleged power of crystals, Metaphysical Night brought in a few critics. One of these critics was Hasan Mahdi, a junior at the university studying math and economics, whose friends convinced him to attend.

“It’s a scam,” Mahdi says. “It may not be real or true but it makes you feel content. It’s a good thing.”

Koreas — who is very much a believer in the power of crystals — also shares Mahdi’s thoughts on the contentment crystals can bring.

“Whatever gets you from point A to point B, use it,” Koreas says. “If it’s crystals, if it’s rocks, if it’s tarot cards, then be open to it and use it. Use it for the greater good.”

Share This

COMMENTS

Wordpress (0)
Disqus ( )