Movie Review: The Hundred-Foot Journey

The Hundred-Foot Journey

DREAMWORKS Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg co-produced The Hundred Foot Journey.

BY

GUEST COLUMNIST

“The Hundred-Foot Journey” is a movie that follows the life of a cook from India working to become a chef in France. Overall, it was an entertaining, lightweight movie with gorgeous cinematography.

The movie transports the viewer to five-star restaurants in France, giving us an inside look at their kitchens. Scenes featuring authentic outdoor markets and the French countryside gave the film a particular charm. The scenery kept the movie interesting, as it might have turned dull otherwise.

The central characters in “The Hundred-Foot Journey” are part of protagonist Hassan’s family, as well as staff members of the main restaurant. The best character by far was Papa, Hassan’s father. Papa provided much-needed comedic relief throughout the movie.

Hassan starts out very relatable: he is a kid who had a passion for cooking and worked hard to follow his dream of becoming a chef. Later in the movie, he becomes too focused on becoming the best and turns into a very different, alienating character.

Madame Mallory, the owner of the famous restaurant, is another complex character. Over the course of the movie, she experiences significant character growth. She starts as a very rude individual; she antagonizes Hasssan’s family and attempts to thwart their opening a restaurant. However, throughout the film, viewers learn more about her past and come to understand some of her actions.

One drawback about the movie is its length. There were at least three different points where the movie could have ended but kept going. A few plot points were unnecessary and forced, which made it hard to stay invested.

“The Hundred-Foot Journey” attempts to be sentimental and sweet, but comes off as slightly cheesy insead. However, the beautiful scenery and shots of delicious food still make this film worth a watch.

These views reflected in this column do not necessarily represent the views of The Review.

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